Sunday, March 19, 2017

Sunday Night Suds - New Belgium Glutiny Golden Ale and Pale Ale


This week's Sunday Night Suds looks at New Belgium's Glutiny line of beers which are not kosher for Passover, but are "gluten free."

I used the quotes around the words gluten free, since the Glutiny products are technically free of gluten, but as opposed to some other beer substitutes, they are made with barley. As explained by the brewery, the Glutiny products are "brewed using an enzyme to break down the proteins that trigger a reaction from gluten sensitive drinkers. Therefore, these beers are being referred to as “gluten removed” instead of gluten free. The beers fall within the FDA guidelines of less than 20 parts per million."

This could also be the reason that the Glutiny products are much more full bodied than the first generation gluten free products. The Pale Ale actually tastes like a Pale Ale with some hop bite, some citrus, decent carbonation and an intriguing flavor profile. The Golden Ale is a bit more subdued and has little in the way of hops or pine and was on the weaker side. Still, it did not have the ersatz taste of beer made with grain substitutes and was quite refreshing.

Although the two Glutiny products are under kosher supervision by the Scroll-K/Va'ad of Denver, not every brew produced by New Belgium is under kosher supervision. For a list of the New Belgium brews currently under supervision, please click on the link on the left side of my home page for my latest Kosher Beer List.

To see what the experts on Beer Advocate think about New Belgium Glutiny Pale Ale beeradvocate.com/beer/profile/192/192254. To see what the experts on Beer Advocate think about New Belgium Glutiny Golden Ale beeradvocate.com/beer/profile/192/199865.

As always, please remember to drink responsibly and to never waste good beer unless there is no designated driver.

If you've tried this beer or any others which have been reviewed on the kosher beers site, please feel free to post your comments (anonymous comments are acceptable).

Please Note - if you are reading this post more than six months after it was written, please note that it is possible that the product is no longer still certified kosher. To verify that the product is still certified kosher, please click on the kosher beers list link on the top left corner of the blog.

If you have seen this post being carried on another site, please feel free to click www.kosherbeers.blogspot.com to find other articles on the kosherbeers blogsite. Hey its free and you can push my counter numbers up!

Thursday, March 16, 2017

Thursday's Parsha Tidbits - Parshas Ki Sissa



The following is a brief summary of some of the thoughts said over by R' Frand on the parsha this evening. I have attempted to reproduce these vorts to the best of my ability. Any perceived inconsistency is the result of my efforts to transcribe the shiur and should not be attributed to R' Frand.

In Shemos 32:17-18 there is an interesting conversation between Moshe and Yehoshua in connection with the voices of the Jews. In Shemos 32:17, Yehoshua tells Moshe "the sound of battle is in the camp." In response, Moshe tells Yehoshua in Shemos 32:18, that it is a "sound of distress."

R' Frand quoted the Yerushalmi which recounts that Moshe's response to Yehoshua was a rebuke. Moshe said to Yehoshua - you are going to be the next leader of the Jewish people, don't you know the difference between the sounds from the Jews? 

R' Frand analogized this to a mother who hears her baby crying and knows whether the sound is a cry because of pain, hunger, diaper or other problem. This is what Moshe was telling Yehoshua that he needed to be tuned into.

R' Frand next quoted R' Schwalb who writes that Yehoshua thought that he heard a drunken crying from the Jewish people which he interpreted as the beginning of a rebellion against Moshe and Hashem. Moshe responded to Yehoshua - yes they are drunk, but it is because they are in pain and are drinking to take the edge off of their concerns and troubles. They think that I (Moshe) have died and that they will be without a leader in the desert. So they drink to avoid thinking about how they may be lost.

R' Frand closed the vort by observing that this is the role of a psychologist or psychiatrist. They may hear or observe the same things as other people, but they are able to recognize it for what it is and they can discern the source of the problem.

R' Frand also said a second vort on the breaking of the luchos. R' Frand asked the famous question - since Hashem had already told Moshe in Shemos 32:7-8 that  the Jews had created the Egel, then why did Moshe bring the luchos down before breaking them? He could have left them up on Har Sinai or in the alternative, he could have broken them when he was up on the mountain, once Hashem told him about the Jews' actions!

R' Frand quoted the Ramban on Parshas Eikev, who explains that Moshe destroyed the luchos because he came down and saw the Jews' dancing in front of the Egel. This was too much for Moshe as the Jews had not only sinned, they were rejoicing in their sin.

R' Frand also quoted the Seforno who said that Moshe broke the luchos specifically because (as stated in Shemos 32:19), Moshe saw the Egel and the dancing before it.

R' Frand also quoted the Mishna Berurah (I did not catch the cite) who writes that the Arizal had a simcha in his doing mitzvos and that this simcha is what allowed him to reach that high of a spiritual level. 

R' Frand tied that into the acts of the Jews ---before they danced, the Jews had sinned but could do teshuva for their acts, even though this was avodah zarah. But once Moshe saw that they were dancing and rejoicing, he had no choice but to break the luchos, as they were no longer capable of doing teshuva.

If you have seen this post being carried on another site, please feel free to click www.kosherbeers.blogspot.com to find other articles on the kosherbeers blogsite. Hey its free and you can push my counter numbers up!

Sunday, March 12, 2017

Sunday Night Suds - Emek Haela Irish Red Ale


This week's Sunday Night Suds looks at Emek Haela's Irish Red Ale.

This is another one of the beers which I picked up in the Beer Bazaar stand in Machane Yehuda and so far it is the best of the bunch. In fact, it might be the best Israeli beer I have ever tasted.

Emek Haela is one of two breweries which are run by Srigim Breweries (the other is Ronen). A link to the main brewery website can be found here www.srigim-beer.co.il/emekhaela.

The beer poured a rich dark copper which bordered on brown. There was decent carbonation, although it did not rise to the level of some American beers. There was not a specific flavor which stood out for this brew, but there was some hops, a little honey and caramel notes and a pleasant malt character in the background which made this a well balanced beer. I would rank this above any American Irish Red that I have ever tried, although it did remind me somewhat of the (late) Pete's Wicked Ale. 

The Emek Haela is certified kosher, but I left the bottle at the home where we had our Purim sedua and I can't recall who issued the kosher certification. If you have a bottle handy please post the kosher certification in the comments below. To see what the experts on Beer Advocate think about this brew (yes its on BA), please follow this link beeradvocate.com/beer/profile/34175/128573.

If you've tried this beer or any others which have been reviewed on the kosher beers site, please feel free to post your comments (anonymous comments are acceptable).

Also, if you are reading this post more than six months after it was written, please note that it is possible that the product is no longer still certified kosher. To verify that the product is still certified kosher, please check the label on the bottle you are purchasing (since the the kosher beers list link does not include beer brewed in Israel).

Lastly, if you have seen this post being carried on another site, please feel free to click www.kosherbeers.blogspot.com to find other articles on the kosherbeers blogsite. Hey its free and you can push my counter numbers up!

Purim 5777/2017 Kosher Beers List

As a community service, Kosher Beers publishes a list twice a year of the beers which are known to be certified kosher. The list will be updated periodically until the next edition (Labor Day 2017). For the Purim 5777/2017 edition, I will again be using scribd to upload and maintain list. All newly added beers are in bold.

Thursday, March 9, 2017

Thursday's Purim Tidbits

The following is a brief summary of some of the thoughts said over by R' Frand in his shiur this evening. With Purim around the corner, both the halacha and post halacha sections were about Purim. I have attempted to reproduce the post halacha vort to the best of my ability. Any perceived inconsistency is the result of my efforts to transcribe the shiur and should not be attributed to R' Frand.

R' Frand mentioned that although you don't need to cross the ocean to learn Torah, he was very impressed with a vort he read in a journal published in England in connection with what I believe was a kollel dinner. (I am a little fuzzy on the details of the event). The vort was written by R' Aryeh Masher (sp?) on Manchester and discusses the piyut Shoshanas Ya'akov which is said after the Megillah is read.

R' Frand said that the statement "shekol koivecha lo yevoshu" - that all who have faith in You will not be humiliated and will not come out wanting --this he said is the main message of the megillah.

R' Frand remarked that it is not so simple to see how the Jews put their faith in Hashem. One could say that after Haman's decree came out the Jews fasted and went into mourning and that this was a show of faith in Hashem. But R' Masher stated that it is more pronounced in the megillah. He noted that earlier in the megillah, Esther is chosen to be the Queen, although she was not the prettiest. But once this happened, the Jews did not say --OK, we have one in the palace, we will be saved. But the Jews did not rely on this and Mordechai in particular says something to Esther which demonstrates that he is putting his faith in Hashem.

When Mordechai comes to Esther and tells her to go to the king, she is hesitant as even she could not visit the king without permission. When says this to Mordechai, he does not respond with the statememt "you are our only hope --you have to do this and without this we will all be destroyed." But Mordechai did not push the proverbial panic button. Instead, Mordechai tells her "if you don't go, the Jews will be saved from another source." Mordechai in effect is saying, if you don't want to be the one that saves the Jews, there will be another way.

R' Frand said that this is the lesson of "shekol koivecha."

R' Frand said that this applies to our every day life as well. A business opportunity may come your way and you feel that "this is it." This will make your business successful and it must go forward. But if a person has faith in Hashem, he will know that Hashem sets his income from Rosh Hashanah and whatever happens with this opportunity, the money you are supposed to have will come to you.

R' Frand said that R' Masher tied it into the statement in davening - "baruch hagever asher yivtach b'Hashem, v'haya Hashem mivtacho" --blessed is the man who puts his faith in Hashem and Hashem will be his faith. The statement appears redundant. But the Malbim explains that the first part of the statement is the blessing to the person who believes that Hashem will save him, but the second is praise to the belief that the person has that Hashem will find the means to save him and its up to Hashem to determine how it will happen.

If you have seen this post being carried on another site, please feel free to click www.kosherbeers.blogspot.com to find other articles on the kosherbeers blogsite. Hey its free and you can push my counter numbers up!

Sunday, March 5, 2017

Sunday Night Suds - Malka IPA


This week's Sunday Night Suds takes a holiday spin by looking at Malka Brewery's Hindi IPA.

This is another of the beers which I picked up in the Beer Bazaar in Machane Yehuda in Jerusalem. I chose these beers without knowledge of their provenance and basically just chose IPAs and Pale Ales because those are my favorite styles. The proprietors of Beer Bazaar do offer a beer tasting which I have been told are two oz shots of ten beers for 20 shekel (approximately $5.25). However, since I was on my way out to meet the rest of the family for dinner, I did not have the opportunity to try it.

The name of the beer Hindi IPA is almost a redundancy as Hindi would be slang for someone from India and an IPA is an India Pale Ale. However unless you can read Hebrew, you would not know that the beer was actually called "Hindi".

The beer poured a dark copper and there was some hops which hit my nose when I raised the glass to my face. The carbonation was low and the alcohol backbone was a bit stronger than I expected for a beer with a 6.2% abv. As I consumed successive sips of this brew I did not notice a development of flavor as it was basically some hops together with a bit of breadiness.

The Malka Hindi IPA is certified kosher by Rav Shlomo Ben Eliyahu, Chief Rabbi of Mateh Asher regional  council and there is a certification mark on the label. To see what the experts on Beer Advocate think about this brew (yes its on BA), please follow this link beeradvocate.com/beer/profile/32374/143829/.

If you've tried this beer or any others which have been reviewed on the kosher beers site, please feel free to post your comments (anonymous comments are acceptable).

Also, if you are reading this post more than six months after it was written, please note that it is possible that the product is no longer still certified kosher. To verify that the product is still certified kosher, please check the label on the bottle you are purchasing (since the the kosher beers list link does not include beer brewed in Israel).

Lastly, if you have seen this post being carried on another site, please feel free to click www.kosherbeers.blogspot.com to find other articles on the kosherbeers blogsite. Hey its free and you can push my counter numbers up!